Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Leif's Newbie Guide/FAQ Updated by Geo

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Leif's Newbie Guide/FAQ Updated by Geo

    This is a work in progress... just trying to help everyone out here by having a simple post for the new folks that have a lot of questions.

    Please feel free to add to this and I will update the original post below.


    Guide to VDubAddiction.


    Newbie/newb/n00b - (adj./noun) you until you read this guide. Any member that is new or shows very little knowledge in the arena of cars or VAG products especially. An assclown.


    Q: Why was this FAQ created?


    A: This guide was created to help new members and old members alike. The new members are always super enthused about having their new car and can not wait until they can get to modding. The older members having been on this board for several, several years get frustrated hearing the same things over and over again. Now this does not mean you can not discuss openly on the board what you desire. Just realize that most of your questions can be found by searching through the forums history and archives. If for some reason you don’t find the answer you were looking for, then please feel free to post up a new question.


    Q: Can you convert a front wheel drive VW to an all wheel drive format?


    A: Empty your wallet. If more than 10-15k falls out, then yes you can. You would need to source out R32 parts or retrofit 4motion euro parts to your car. Is it worth it? Probably not. Since there is already an AWD VW available it would make more sense to just trade up to an R32.


    Q: Can I use a boost controller on my car?


    A: Yes and No. You can use a boost controller on any car that is equipped with a turbo. A Boost controller only controls boost. You are not adjusting the proper levels of fuel and timing to go along with that added power and boost. So on VAG (VW/Audi/Seat/Skoda) Cars… no, you can not use a boost controller.


    These cars take very well to chips for a reason. It is a reliable way of altering the boost as well as the fuel and timing maps for a safe mod that isn’t going to be too hard on the engine.


    Q: Are chips really as “safe” as you say they are?


    A: Chips are just like anything else. In moderation chipped cars are a wonderful and fun mod to the stock setup; if abused it will cause the engine or turbo to fail on a faster rate than normal. Preventative measures such as proper cool down and warm up times, high octane fuel, replacing the bypass valve with a stronger unit and regular oil changes should reward you with a fun, rewarding drive.


    Q: What chip is the best for me?


    A: What is the sound of one hand clapping? Both of these questions have about as much weight in the community. Each chip does their own special things and it’s basically a trade off game with each one. Also some chips seem a little more aggressive (i.e. harder on components) than other. Here are a few brands to research in no particular order: GIAC, APR, Revo, Upsolute, Unitronic, and COBB Tuning.


    Q: Will a chip void my warranty?


    A: Yes. The bottom line is a chip will void your warranty. The law states that a warranty can be void if the altered part caused the system in question to fail. If you take your chipped VW/Audi in for service about your suspension squeaking, it would most likely be covered as long as you didn’t modify the suspension. If you take it in for a blown turbo and they see your ECU has been modified, then the powertrain portion of your warranty will be voided and you are stuck with the bill. Once again if the altered part causes the failure, then it can and will be voided by the dealer.


    Another thing to worry about is flagging. For example if you bring your chipped VW/Audi in the dealer for the suspension squeak and they notice you’re chipped, they’re going to flag your car, fix the squeak and send you on your way. Two months later you get a blown turbo and you take the car into the dealer. Even if you swapped back to a stock ECU, they have record the car was chipped at one time and they will void your warranty.


    Q: What’s a bypass valve (aka: DV, Divertor Valve)?


    A: A bypass valve is basically a valve that releases charged air built into the intake side of the turbo when the throttle closes. This air is then rerouted into the air intake. VAG products were designed for this system.


    Q: Why not use a blow-off valve?


    A: A blow-off does the exact same thing but with a little bit of a twist. Instead of venting the air back into the intake it releases it into the atmosphere. Yes, you do get a cool “psft” sound when it activates but think of what you’re actually doing. Air designed to go back into the engine is rerouted and released in the atmosphere. The ECU thinks this air is present in the intake and increases the fuel to compensate for the additional air. Less air + more fuel = a rich fuel condition. A rich condition is bad on the cat, causes soot build up in the exhaust and can lead to misfires and poor gas mileage. BOV’s tend to work well with Japanese import cars.


    Q: What is lean & rich mean?


    A: With lean and rich we’re talking about the correct mixture of air to fuel needed to create a completely flammable presence in the cylinder at the right time. The timing is crucial. Correct air to fuel (called the A/F ratio) is 14.7:1. This means it takes 14.7 parts of air to 1 part of fuel. Adding twice as much air would result in needing twice as much fuel. Anything below 14.7:1 is termed as “rich” meaning there is an over abundance of fuel. Although this is not too harmful it is very inefficient. You are not burning off all of the fuel in the mixture inside the engine usually creating a power loss. The opposite of this, or anything above 14.7:1 is termed as “lean.” “Lean is mean” is how I grew up. The leaner the mixture the more power you create. The problem with this is anything above 14.7 can become volatile in the engine, igniting the mixture before the piston reach top dead center. The piston is moving up and the explosion happens to early. The piston can still only travel up but the explosion causes downward pressure on the piston. The piston and rod have only one place to go and that’s sideways… out of your engine block! Most people play it safe and stay on the rich side as stoichometric (being able to stay at 14.7:1 is nearly impossible.


    Q: How does a turbo work?


    A: A turbo is basically an exhaust driven pump. Engines work off of 3 basic principles: air, fuel, and spark. Fuel and spark are the easy ones as they can be adjusted by chips, lemmiwinks, bigger injectors/pump, and cooler/hotter plugs. It’s harder to make an engine suck more air though. Using forced induction is the answer. Like I said before, a turbo is basically an exhaust driven pump. If you were to take a turbo apart you would first notice its location. It’s an interruption in the path of escaping exhaust and incoming air to the engine. The turbo is split into two different sides: the exhaust (hot) side & the intake (cold) side. These two pipes (shaped like a seashell) are connected by a common shaft between them called the impellor shaft. On each end of this shaft is an impellor (think of a pinwheel shape). As the exhaust exits the engine it spins the hot pinwheel that is connected to the cold pinwheel. The faster this pinwheel shaft spins by exiting exhaust air, the faster air is drawn into the engine on the cold side. Add more spark and fuel and you get more power.


    Q: How does nitrous work?


    A: Nitrous works a lot like the above theory with the turbo. Remember the air, fuel, spark components in an engine? Since nitrous-oxide is composed of two parts nitrogen and one part oxygen, injecting nitrous-oxide is like “sneaking” more air into the engine. Nitrous-oxide splits into oxygen at high temperatures making the inside of an engine a perfect place for this to happen. With more oxygen in the cylinder you would need more fuel in the combustion chamber to keep a lean condition from happening. This is where most people get in trouble. Two flavors of nitrous-oxide systems are dry and wet setups. A dry setup is a hose routed into the intake and adjust the fuel by programming or an additional mechanism (most work by increasing fuel pressure). The wet setup is a lot more complex but usually consists of turning on additional fuel injectors along with the nitrous injectors.


    Q: Horsepower vs. Torque. What’s the difference?


    A: I suggest you read this article as things can get overly complicated with this subject.

    http://auto.howstuffworks.com/horsepower.htm


    Q: Why upgrade the suspension?


    A: Upgrading the suspension usually involves stiffer springs, shocks for stiffer rebound (ability to recover after a bump), and stiffer sway bars. By doing all of this you lower the cars center of gravity and greatly reduce it’s ability to “sway” allowing you to corner at much higher speeds as well as having greater maneuverability at higher speeds. Please realize with lowering your car you will be more likely to “bottom out” while driving around. Speed bumps and potholes can defiantly ruin your day. Good brands to look for are: H&R, K&W, and Bilstein shocks. Keep in mind that going too low can have a negative impact on cornering ability.


    Q: What suspension suits me best?


    A: The following are different options to consider when upgrading your suspension:


    Level 1: Sweet and simple… springs. Lowering springs are going to lower your anywhere from .75-2.5” at each corner depending on the brand you get. Expect to spend ~200.00 for the springs and 100.00 -150.00 in labor.

    Level 2: Springs, shocks, sway bars. Same as above but with stiffer shocks to match up to the stiffer springs. The larger (thus stiffer) sway bars are going to keep body roll/sway (tendency for a car to squat to the left or right while turning) to a minimum thus increasing the tire to ground contact patch. Expect to spend anywhere from 500.00 -1200.00 in parts and anywhere from 100.00-300.00 in labor.

    Level 3: Coilovers, sway bars, poly bushings. This is the ultimate setup and can also be the ultimate pain in the ass. This setup is used for either road racing (on a open track) or for people that are into car shows. The height, rebound, and stiffness can be “dialed in” when desired. Going to a show or autoX? Lower it in the weeds and stiffen those shocks. Taking a long drive? Soften everything up for a nice comfortable road trip. Expect to spend anywhere from 800.00 -2100.00 in parts and anywhere from 150.00 and up to install. Not for the mechanically retarded. Remember with each height change an alignment may be necessary.

    Bagz: Air ride suspension can allow the car to change ride height by changing the amount of air pressure in the air bags. This type of setup may not be as plug and play as some of the other options above. Modification to the vehicle's frame is required if the object is to allow the vehicle to sit on the ground when most pressure is released from the air bags.


    Q: What’s a VAG-COM?


    A: A VAG-COM is a device that plugs into the OBDII interface on all VAG cars made after 95. With this you can reset certain perimeters in the ECU, log things such as boost, oil temps, MAF flow, as well as tons of other variables. One of the most useful reasons for acquiring this tool is that you can pull DTC (“trouble codes”, check engine light causes). Such DTC may read DTC xxxxx misfire on cylinder 3. This would let you pinpoint where your problem may lie. They can be purchased through Ross-tech; http://www.ross-tech.com/.


    Q: What are Vag-Com "tricks"?


    A: Vag-Com tricks can be confused by some as life hacks. They refer to changes that can be made with the Ross-Tech Vag-Com program to better suit your needs or wants. Different cars have different capabilites depending on year model and equipment installed. For instance, the mk5 models (2006.5 - 2010) can activate the electric windows using the wireless key fob. Other items can be, but not limited to, disable or change the lights used as your daytime running lights (DRL's). Be sure to check your local traffic laws before applying any changes.


    Q: What are "e-codes?"


    A: E-codes are any part carried on stock european spec VAG products. A big upgrade here in the US market is to convert headlights to e-codes as they give a different beam pattern than the US-spec items. You'll also find with some products to swap bumpers, grills, and sometimes even motors with their e-spec equivilent.


    Q: What’s a Mk1/Mk2/Mk3/Mk4, B5, etc etc.


    A: These are generation terms used to identify VAG product model years. Below are a few that come to mind:

    Mk1/A1: First generation VW – Rabbit, GTi, Jetta, Scirocco, Truck

    Mk2/A2: Second generation – VW GTi, Jetta, Corrado

    Mk3/A3: Third generation – VW GTi, Jetta

    Mk4/A4: Fourth generation – VW GTi, Jetta, New Beetle, Audi TT, A3, S3

    B1: First generation – VW Passat, Audi Fox/VW Dasher

    B2: Second generation – VW Passat, Audi 4000/5000 & VW Quantum

    B3: Third generation – VW Passat

    B4: Fourth generation – VW Passat

    B5: Fifth generation – VW Passat

    B5.5: Mid-model change to B5 generation – VW Passat, Audi A4/S4/RS4

    B6: Sixth generation – Audi A4/S4

    C1: First generation – Audi A6/S6/RS6

    C2: Second Generation – Upcoming Audi A6

    D2: First generation – Audi A8/S8 (Ronin body)

    D3: Second generation – Audi A8


    Q: What does FSI and TSI mean?


    A: FSI stands for”Fuel Stratified Injection,” TSI for

    “Turbo Stratified Injection.” Both of these initialisms apply to engines with Volkswagen Audi Group’s direct fuel injection technology. These engines feature highly pressurized fuel in a common rail that injects directly into each cylinder’s combustion chamber. Compared to port injection, direct injection allows for a higher compression ratio, improved driveability, greater fuel economy, and more power. Direct injection also presents unique issues.

    All variations in terminology; Turbo FSI, TSI, TFSI, etc. are the result of marketing decisions. Don’t get confused by the names, all of these engines share similar technological and mechanical features. However, there are nuances among engines, some fairly inconsequental and others quite evolutionary. (compliments of ECS Tuning; http://bd8ba3c866c8cbc330ab-7b26c6f3...om/FSIvTSI.pdf)


    Q: What is a Bentley?


    A: Most people would think of a Bentley as a car. A really expensive, baller status, car. Bentley Publishers is a company who has many publications for repairing Volkswagens. If a how-to is created or specific questions answered, there is a good chance it came a Bentley Manual. The books/data can be pricey but typically contain a lot of great info. (http://www.bentleypublishers.com/)


    Q: What are some of the aircooled models?


    A: VW TYPE 1 (aka T1, TI): Beetle, SuperBeetle, Ghia, Hebmuller, Thing

    VW TYPE 2 (aka T2, TII): Transporter Bus, Van, Vanagon

    VW TYPE 3 (aka T3, TIII): Notchback, Fastback, Squareback

    VW TYPE 4 (aka T4, TIV): Models 411 & 412

    (From http://www.aircooled.net/vw-type-system/)


    Q: What are different aircooled engines?


    A: Type 1 “Upright” Engine:


    Sizes 36HP, 40 HP, 1300cc, 1500cc (single port), 1600cc (single port), 1500cc (dual port), 1600cc (dual port)

    1500cc and 1600cc Type 1 engines switched to dual port intakes in 1971


    Type 2 “Upright” Engine:


    Early Type 2s were fitted with Type 1 engines. The engines were essentially interchangeable, but since the Transporter was a heavier vehicle which needed more power to move, they typically had a larger sized engine in any given model year.

    68-71 Type 2 engines were still a Type 1 engine, but now were modified by drilling the crankcase for mounting to a cross member

    Late Type 2s were fitted with Type 4 Flat engines (see below)


    Type 3 “Pancake” Engine: 1600cc


    Basically a Type 1 engine again, but with different cooling system, clutch and exhaust.

    Starting in 1971, dual intake ports were introduced on the cylinder heads, which had all had single intake ports up to that point.


    Type 4 “Flat” or “Suitcase” Engine: 1700cc, 1800cc, 2000cc


    The Type 4 is called a “flat” engine, because the cooling fan is fitted directly to the end of crankshaft. The Type 4 made use of a new more durable all aluminum crankcase.

    (From http://www.aircooled.net/vw-type-system/)


    Q: Where can I find more information for air cooled models?


    A:

    http://www.thesamba.com/vw/

    http://www.aircooled.net

    http://www.vw-resource.com/index.html

    http://www.aircooledtech.com/


    Last edited by Leif; 12-18-2004, 06:11 PM.
    2002 Audi S4
    Stage 3 project scrapped... now for sale!

    PearlS4.net

    Click here to visit the new member FAQ

    Originally posted by 007
    thats cool. i'm rokkiin a chicks car that has 211 whp. i can beat alot of cars with it.

  • #2
    Note for Leif

    >more info space here if needed<
    2002 Audi S4
    Stage 3 project scrapped... now for sale!

    PearlS4.net

    Click here to visit the new member FAQ

    Originally posted by 007
    thats cool. i'm rokkiin a chicks car that has 211 whp. i can beat alot of cars with it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Leif's Newbie Guide/FAQ

      Originally posted by Leif

      Q: What’s the difference in the GTI, 337, 20th A.E., and the R32.

      A: The GTI is usually a 1.8T or VR6 engine in a two door hatch back model. The 337/20th A.E. was just a 1.8T GTI with a color matched body, different wheels, and interior. The R32 was a major change to the format of the GTI bringing a 240hp 3.2 liter VR6 matched up to an all wheel drive configuration.

      so they are one color?...lol
      '74 Audi Fox 1.5L of fury ~smokes the competition~

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Re: Leif's Newbie Guide/FAQ

        Originally posted by Geo



        so they are one color?...lol
        only you would pick that out. lol
        2002 Audi S4
        Stage 3 project scrapped... now for sale!

        PearlS4.net

        Click here to visit the new member FAQ

        Originally posted by 007
        thats cool. i'm rokkiin a chicks car that has 211 whp. i can beat alot of cars with it.

        Comment


        • #5
          ..

          i thought the R32 was 242hp..not 240..oh well..minor technicality...
          2001 Audi A4 k04 GIAC manual
          1999 G2 supercharged passat manual

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: ..

            Originally posted by 1bdmk3
            i thought the R32 was 242hp..not 240..oh well..minor technicality...
            stated in car and driver (sept 04) as 240hp and 236tq.
            2002 Audi S4
            Stage 3 project scrapped... now for sale!

            PearlS4.net

            Click here to visit the new member FAQ

            Originally posted by 007
            thats cool. i'm rokkiin a chicks car that has 211 whp. i can beat alot of cars with it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: ..

              Originally posted by 1bdmk3
              i thought the R32 was 242hp..not 240..oh well..minor technicality...
              I think the european version is 242
              Jetta
              I engineer trains

              Comment


              • #8
                lol...look what I started


                and there are 2.0 gti's too
                '74 Audi Fox 1.5L of fury ~smokes the competition~

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Geo
                  lol...look what I started


                  and there are 2.0 gti's too
                  updated.

                  Does anyone see anything that is missing that is commonly asked?
                  2002 Audi S4
                  Stage 3 project scrapped... now for sale!

                  PearlS4.net

                  Click here to visit the new member FAQ

                  Originally posted by 007
                  thats cool. i'm rokkiin a chicks car that has 211 whp. i can beat alot of cars with it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Leif


                    updated.

                    Does anyone see anything that is missing that is commonly asked?
                    Yes, "who drives the badass GTI I saw on this street at this time??" That ____ needs to stop especially when talking about a Mk4 GTI.
                    1977 2.0L 16V Rabbit

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The GTI didnt come as a 2.0 in mk4 form and there are some other incorrect items in there but that was a lot of writing.

                      Did you write that or copy it?

                      Drive Fast, Take Chances: BMW 135i | Spec Miata 1.6 | Ford F-350 DRW | Jeep Grand Cherokee

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        did you get the bolt pattern?....hehe...what offset can I run?....what is the biggest spacer I can use?
                        '74 Audi Fox 1.5L of fury ~smokes the competition~

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          what about the 6 speed tranny?
                          Wagënspeed

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            pretty sure the 99.5 mk4 came in a 2L for a GTI. and a VR6 isn't any harder to mod than a 1.8t. for less money, my vr6 keeps up just fine with bolt on to bolt mods. this thread sucks.
                            gti +12psi
                            Troy-Bilt 6.75hp

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              BTW, nice write up, this should be a sticky for the noobs .

                              Thread title should be "FAQ and answers to stupd BOV questions"

                              Wagënspeed

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X